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Abbaye de Fontevraud by Patrick Jouin/ Jouin Manku | Posted by CJWHO.comAbbaye de Fontevraud by Patrick Jouin/ Jouin Manku | Posted by CJWHO.comAbbaye de Fontevraud by Patrick Jouin/ Jouin Manku | Posted by CJWHO.comAbbaye de Fontevraud by Patrick Jouin/ Jouin Manku | Posted by CJWHO.comAbbaye de Fontevraud by Patrick Jouin/ Jouin Manku | Posted by CJWHO.comAbbaye de Fontevraud by Patrick Jouin/ Jouin Manku | Posted by CJWHO.comAbbaye de Fontevraud by Patrick Jouin/ Jouin Manku | Posted by CJWHO.comAbbaye de Fontevraud by Patrick Jouin/ Jouin Manku | Posted by CJWHO.com

the-gasoline-station:

Abbaye de Fontevraud

by Patrick Jouin/ Jouin Manku | via

Patrick Jouin and Sanjit Manky is a design tandem whose works meet at the crossroads of industrial production and craftsmanship. In all their projects they seek to maintain a balance between innovation and grace. Their latest project is a fine example of this rule. The designers rearranged the interior of an old Saint-Lazare priory to host a hotel and a restaurant. Over the centuries the building had served monks and nuns, been used as a hospice and at one point even a prison. In 1980s it was first transformed into a hotel. The project reinterprets the story of Saint-Lazare for the future. Corresponding with the space which avoids unnecessary stylistic effects, the designers introduced their own pared-down and elegant style. This resulted as a sensual and refined interior of a mystical, ancient monastery.

„We quietly slipped into the Saint-Lazare priory, immersing ourselves in its history and its uniqueness. We tried to capture its essence, from its monastic simplicity to its prison austerity via the wisdom and philosophy of those who built and lived here. Then we had to fine-tune our approach, to give life to a contemporary vision that would respect and preserve the spirit of the building. We didn’t want the visitor to forget where they were. On the contrary, we wanted to assure an intimate experience of the site, allowing the visitor to appropriate fragments of the past in comfort. Achieving this also meant rising to the challenge of the constraints imposed by the building’s classification as an historic monument, notably that we were not permitted to touch the ceilings and the walls. The best approach was to find a way to turn these constraints into opportunities.”

Photography: Nicolas Mathéus

(Source: cjwho)

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“ There’s all these songs about loving a girl who doesn’t know she’s beautiful. But what about loving a girl that does? How come liking myself makes me less appealing? ”

—    My 12 year old cousin is actually pretty deep (via imjust-a-girl)

(via lipstick-feminists)

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bookshop:

solongasitswords:

nullbula:

thesylverlining:

what happened in roughly 1870 though

why was there temporary internet

with a few people searching for pokemon?

It’s a search of Google books, but the question still stands, what the Fuck happened in 1870

I CAN ANSWER THIS!!

In the Cornish dialect of English, Pokemon meant ‘clumsy’ (pure coincidence).

In the mid 1800s there was a surge of writing about the Cornish language and dialect in an attempt to preserve them with glossaries and dictionaries being written. I wrote about it HERE.

I just love that this post happened to find the ONE HUMAN ON THE INTERNET who had the answer to this question

(Source: neilcicierega, via samknitchester)

“ Notice me senpai. ”

—    Shishio
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RICHARD ARMITAGE HAS TWITTER!!! AND IT’S HIS BIRTHDAY!

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tinycatfeet:

kvotheunkvothe:

brodingershat:

That point in a piece of fanfiction where you can tell something embarrassing is about to happen so you start fucking around on tumblr because you’re a huge baby with a crippling overabudance of empathy.

I do this with every media I consume. I pause movies and have to walk around and prepare myself for second-hand embarrassment sometimes.

my secondhand embarrassment is horrible. I can’t watch some episodes of the office. I give an excuse to leave the room when I know an awkward scene is coming up in a movie. (“do you want me to pause it?” “NO”)

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